Belgian Beers

  • Blanche de Namur

    Blanche de Namur
    Blanche de Namur
    270 ฿
    Référence:
    B01

    Detail

    Blanche de Namur is made from barley malt, unmalted wheat, hops, and the classic witbier spices: coriander and bitter orange peel. It also has a touch of brewer's licorice. Hopping levels are fairly low to allow the spices to shine through; the yeast strain is traditional, and Blanche de Namur is bottle-conditioned.
  • Kriek St Louis

    Kriek St Louis
    Kriek St Louis
    240 ฿
    Référence:
    B02

    Detail

    Cherry beer - Traditionally, kriek is made by breweries in and around Brussels using lambic beer to which sour cherries (with the pits) are added. A lambic is a sour and dry Belgian beer, fermented spontaneously with airborne yeast said to be native to Brussels; the presence of cherries predates the almost universal use of hops as a flavoring in beer.
  • Raspberry St. Louis

    Raspberry St. Louis
    Raspberry St. Louis
    240 ฿
    Référence:
    B03

    Detail

    Traditionally, kriek is made by breweries in and around Brussels using lambic beer to which sour cherries (with the pits) are added. A lambic is a sour and dry Belgian beer, fermented spontaneously with airborne yeast said to be native to Brussels; the presence of raspberries predates the almost universal use of hops as a flavoring in beer.
  • Kasteel Rouge

    Kasteel Rouge
    Kasteel Rouge
    280 ฿
    Référence:
    B04

    Detail

    Beer Berries - Van Honsebrouck is a Belgian brewery in Ingelmunster, Belgium. Founded in 1865 as Sint-Jozef Brewery, it was renamed to Brewery Van Honsebrouck in 1953. It is one of two breweries outside of Pajottenland to produce lambic beer.
  • Lucifer

    Lucifer
    Lucifer
    300 ฿
    Référence:
    B07

    Detail

    Strong Blonde Beer
  • Bush

    Bush
    Bush
    280 ฿
    Référence:
    b11

    Detail

    Amber beer
  • Duvel

    Duvel
    Duvel
    320 ฿
    Référence:
    b16

    Detail

    To commemorate the end of World War I, the Moortgats named their main beer Victory Ale. In the 1920s, an avid drinker described the beer as "nen echten duvel" (a real devil in Brabantian Dutch) - perhaps in reference to its formidable alcohol content (8.5% ABV) - and the name of the beer was changed to Duvel. It has become the brewery's flagship beer. Considered by many the definitive version of the Belgian Strong Pale Ale style, Duvel is brewed with Pilsner malt and dextrose, and hopped with Saaz hops and Styrian Goldings, the yeast still stems from the original culture of Scottish yeast bought by Albert Moortgat during a business tour of the U.K. just after World War I.
  • Triple Karmeliet

    Triple Karmeliet
    Triple Karmeliet
    310 ฿
    Référence:
    b17

    Detail

    Tripel Karmeliet is a golden Belgian beer with high alcohol by volume (8.4%), brewed by Brouwerij Bosteels in Buggenhout, Belgium. It was first brewed in 1996 and uses three cereals: wheat, oats and barley. This beer is still brewed according to an authentic beer recipe from 1679 derived from the old Carmelite convent in Dendermonde. The beer is then bottle-conditioned. As a result of high demand after winning the Best Pale Ale World Beer Awards in 2008, sales increased unexpectedly in 2009 and numerous pubs didn't have enough delivered. To meet the new demand, production was increased by 30% with the addition of a new brew vessel, accounting for an additional 6000 hectolitres (approximately 158,500 US gallons) annually.
  • Waterloo Triple

    Waterloo Triple
    Waterloo Triple
    290 ฿
    Référence:
    B18

    Detail

    The triple blond is both simple and complex. Its initial simplicity, with an easy approach that releases a sweet zest is quickly complemented by a bitterness that runs to the back of the mouth. Complex, with its raw ingredients clashing a little like cannon shots, but each tastier than the last, with alternating bitter hops and the flexibility of its malt, gives this Waterloo beer the taste of victory.
  • Rochefort 8

    Rochefort 8
    Rochefort 8
    360 ฿
    Référence:
    b19

    Detail

    Rochefort 8 (green cap, brown beer, 9.2% ABV). Yellowish-brown colour, with more fruits and a slight amount of Demi-sec. This variety constitutes the largest proportion of production. Dates from 1955. Originally this beer was only brewed for New Year’s Eve celebrations. "Rochefort 8" begins with a density of 20.8º Plato and reaches a final 9.2% ABV. Due to the overwhelming success of this beer, the monks decided around 1960 to brew it on a regular basis. Sometimes this beer is also referred to as the "Special".
  • Westmalle Triple

    Westmalle Triple
    Westmalle Triple
    390 ฿
    Référence:
    b20

    Detail

    Westmalle Brewery (Brouwerij der Trappisten van Westmalle) is a Trappist brewery in the Westmalle Abbey, Belgium. It produces three beers, designated as Trappist beer by the International Trappist Association. Westmalle Tripel is credited with being the first golden strong pale ale to use the term Tripel. History The Trappist abbey in Westmalle (officially called Abdij Onze-Lieve-Vrouw van het Heilig Hart van Jezus) was founded 6 June 1794, but the community was not elevated to the rank of Trappist abbey until 22 April 1836. Martinus Dom, the first abbot, decided the abbey would brew its own beer, and the first beer was brewed on 1 August 1836 and first imbibed on 10 December 1836. The pioneer brewers were Father Bonaventura Hermans and Albericus Kemps. The first beer was described as light in alcohol and rather sweet. By 1856, the monks had added a second beer: the first strong brown beer. This brown beer is today considered the first double (dubbel, in Dutch). The current Dubbel is derived from a recipe first brewed in 1926. Local sales began in 1856 and the oldest registered sale was on 1 January 1861. The brewery was enlarged and rebuilt in 1865 based on the example set by the Trappists of Forges (nearby Chimay). Father Ignatius van Ham joined the brewer team. Further commercialisation and sales to traders commenced in 1921. In 1933 a complete new brewery was built and in 1934, the brewery brewed a strong pale ale of 9.5% abv giving it the name Tripel - the first modern use of the name.The brewery was remodeled in 1991. It currently has a bottling capacity of 45,000 bottles per hour, and yearly output of 120,000 hl (in 2004). The majority of the workers in the brewery are no longer monks, but secular staff brought in from outside. There are 22 monks and 40 outside staff.